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‘Black Lives Matter’ Narrative Against Police Officers Just Got Demolished By New Data

For the last several years, race baiters throughout the country have tried to play the race card just about every chance they’ve had, demonizing the police force along the way, and practically suggesting all police officers are racist and more likely to use force when dealing with African-American suspects.

However, according to a report from The Dallas Observer, a new study of the Dallas Police Department shuts that narrative down:

“A new study published in July’s American Journal of Public Health attacks one of contemporary policing’s biggest questions using data culled from the Dallas Police Department. The central question: Are white police officers more likely to use force against nonwhite suspects?
The answer in Dallas appears to be no, according to the study by researchers in Texas and Florida.

Before getting too far into the numbers, it’s important to note the parameters of the study. The researchers considered 5,630 use-of-force reports from DPD, collected from 2014-15. The incidents the researchers analyzed do not include events in which officers shot or used lethal force against subjects. Those incidents, according to the researchers, don’t occur often enough to create a sufficient sample for study.”

Additionally, according to Daily Caller:
“Researcher Stephen Bishopp, a professor at the University of North Texas, says there’s more to the numbers than just this cursory view. When he and fellow researchers controlled for outside factors, such as suspect cooperation and the officer’s size, the relationship between race and use of force disappeared.

“There’s much more involved than a person’s race, whether it’s the officer’s race or the suspect’s race,” Bishopp, also a sergeant at DPD, told the Dallas Observer. “Some of those things include: Is the suspect committing a crime when the office confronts him? Is the suspect drunk or high on drugs? Is the suspect being cooperative? Is the officer a two-year officer or a 25-year officer? Is the officer 6’5″ and 260 pounds? Or is the officer a 5-foot female who is 100 pounds soaking wet with her equipment on?”

The researchers also found that, after controlling for these situations, black officers were less likely to use “hard-empty hand control” with black suspects. “Hard-empty hand” control refers to an officer striking a suspect with his hands to subdue him.

“I think that there’s a narrative about what police use of force looks like, and I think that when officers misuse force, they should be reprimanded and punished accordingly. But I also think that we need to treat officers as fairly as we do anybody else and amass all of the information before we can develop any sense of finding in one way or the other,” Bishopp told Decider Magazine.”

Also, during that interview with Decider Magazine, Bishopp explained that this new study should help the debate around officers and the use of force by providing more data for both sides.

“…So I think that there’s a narrative about what police use of force looks like, and I think that when officers misuse force, they should be reprimanded and punished accordingly. But I also think that we need to treat officers as fairly as we do anybody else and amass all of the information before we can develop any sense of finding in one way or the other. And that takes time. A lot of people want an instantaneous decision about why an officer did this or an officer did that. We can’t be quick to rush to judgment. We have to be able to get all of the data, all of the information. That’s not a five minute decision. That’s a very painstaking process, which is unlike an officer’s split second decision to use force.”

While it’s certainly true that there are some bad apples in police departments, the demonizing of the police force as a whole must stop.  We’re talking about people who risk their lives everyday to serve and protect others.

Who knows?  Maybe more of these studies will do the trick, and shut the narrative down completely.

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